Why Running A Background Check On Yourself Is So Important

Background check reports can contain potentially damaging information, which could cause you to miss out on a good job opportunity, without even knowing why. The worst part is, some of the information being reported on these background check reports, may not even be correct. 

Many job seekers spend countless hours creating and strengthening their resumes, going over interview tactics, or picking out the right outfit for the interview, however, many job candidates never think about the background check report. Ignoring the background check issue is a mistake that many candidates make and it could prevent you from landing your dream job. Considering the fact that many employers do not allow candidates to explain their records before hiring decisions are made, it is extremely valuable for you to know the information that is being reported about you. 



Many job seekers assume that there is a centralized database, like credit reporting agencies, that all employers have access to where they can obtain criminal records. When it comes to criminal background check reports, however, things are more complicated. There is no one centralized database that contains all criminal records. Instead, most criminal databases are aggregated from court records across the U.S. 

Unlike negative information credit histories which fall off after about seven years, arrest records stay on your permanent record. Even worse, these records don’t display whether a case was dismissed or not, if the charges were dropped, or if you were found not guilty. 

Mistakes on criminal databases are made more often than not. There a plenty of times that qualified job candidates are denied potential job opportunities because of information being reported on a background search that was inadvertently pulled from someone else’s criminal record. 

In addition to that, identity theft is a growing issue in the U.S. The 2013 Identity Fraud Report found there were 12.7 million victims of identity fraud in 2012. 

With the increase of identity theft, it’s possible that someone else committing offenses using your identity is now being reported under your own background check, which also means, you could lose out on a great job opportunity through no fault of your own. 

Now that you understand how important it is in the job search to be familiar with your own background, how do you get ahead of the background check and take control of your own story? 

Cleaning up information shown on social media and on search engines is a great start. Employers can easily check Google and social media pages for information you’re sharing. Reviewing this information will help clean up your digital footprint. 

Deleting things on social media to clean up your footprint is a step in the right direction, but it can’t change what shows up in a background report to employers so what should you do? 

Run a background check on yourself! 

Running a self background check can help you get ahead of the potential employers and if necessary, clean up your own reputation. You can contact the information bureaus, including the credit bureau, the county courthouse and the federal court. If an arrest record displays on your background check, you can talk to a lawyer about getting it expunged from your permanent record. If the information you receive doesn’t belong to you, you can take steps to reclaim your identity. 

In addition, if you need to know what your credit looks like, you can sign into AnnualCreditReport[dot]com. The site allows you to check your credit and know what is being reported. If you see a mistake in your information, you can request a dispute form from the agency within 30 days and set your record straight. 

Knowledge is power and employer background checks are a lot more in-depth than just Googling your name. IntelHawk Private Investigations offers a self-background check search in order to give you this power of knowledge. By having knowledge on your side, you can clear your name and ensure that you never miss out on another great opportunity because of a mistaken criminal record.

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